Glenveagh National Park welcomes back the majestic Native Scots Pine!

"National Parks and Wildlife Service plants record-breaking 2,000 native Irish Scots Pine trees at Glenveagh National Park in Co. Donegal"

The National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) has announced that a total of 2,000 native Irish Scots Pine trees have been planted at Glenveagh National Park, Co. Donegal, making it the largest plantation of its kind to date. The move is part of a wider conservation effort to improve the native woodland in the park. The trees were sourced from a grower in Co. Galway, who collected the pine seed in the Burren National Park, under licence from the NPWS.

According to the NPWS, the native Scots Pine woodland in Glenveagh is the first step in a wider native woodland conservation programme in Glenveagh National Park, that will focus on the long-term vision of creating favourable conditions for natural woodland habitat within the park. The conservation effort also includes ongoing measures to curb invasive species, deer management and the creation of a tree nursery in the park.

The location chosen for the plantation in a 1.6/ha field will ensure that the trees will grow well and produce good seed – to establish good woodland, the soil must be suitable and the trees must be safe from grazing deer. Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan TD said: “Scots Pine is a tree species native to Ireland and its reintroduction to one of our six national parks is testament to the work our National Parks and Wildlife Service is doing to restore native woodlands.”

Woodlands are crucial to the ecosystem as they provide a home for a wide range of wildlife, plants, birds and insects. The planting of these trees is a significant step in the conservation effort to restore Glenveagh National Park’s natural heritage.

The NPWS has been working tirelessly to ensure that the native woodland in the park is preserved and protected. The planting of these trees is part of a broader suite of measures designed to improve native woodland in the park. The NPWS has been working to curb invasive species, manage deer populations and create a tree nursery in the park.

The location chosen for the plantation is significant as it will ensure that the trees grow well and produce good seed. The soil must be suitable for the trees to establish good woodland, and the trees must be safe from grazing deer. The planting of these trees is a testament to the work of the National Parks and Wildlife Service, and Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan TD has praised their efforts.

The planting of these trees is a significant step in restoring Glenveagh National Park’s natural heritage. The native Scots Pine woodland in Glenveagh is the first step in a wider native woodland conservation programme in Glenveagh National Park. The long-term vision is to create favourable conditions for natural woodland habitat within the park.

The NPWS has been working tirelessly to ensure that Glenveagh National Park’s natural heritage is preserved and protected. The planting of these trees is part of a broader suite of measures designed to improve native woodland in the park. The NPWS has been working to curb invasive species, manage deer populations and create a tree nursery in the park.

The location chosen for the plantation is significant as it will ensure that the trees grow well and produce good seed. The soil must be suitable for the trees to establish good woodland, and the trees must be safe from grazing deer. The planting of these trees is a testament to the work of the National Parks and Wildlife Service, and Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan TD has praised their efforts.

Matt Lyons

Matt Lyons

Matt Lyons is the founder of Forestry & Carbon. Matt has over 25 years as a forestry consultant and is invoilved in numerous carbon credit offset projects.

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