Timber Tensions: Scottish Forestry Slams the Door on Spruce Exports to Ireland

"Scottish Forestry Implements Stricter Regulations on Spruce Log Movement to Ireland"

Scottish Forestry has announced new restrictions on the movement of spruce logs with bark to the “island of Ireland” from certain areas in the west of Scotland’s Pest Free Area (PFA). The aim of these measures is to reduce the risks associated with the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (D. micans). The Scottish government agency has been working closely with government departments in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland to implement these measures.

The agency has confirmed that a 35 km buffer zone will be established around locations where the D. micans bark beetle has been detected. As part of the new restrictions, spruce timber moving under a phytosanitary certificate will only be permitted to travel through the 35 km buffer zone between October 1st and March 31st. This timeframe falls outside of the flying season for the D. micans bark beetle. During this period, the timber should not be stored in the buffer zone but can be loaded at ports.

It is important to note that phytosanitary certificates confirming that conifer timber is free from D. micans will not be issued within 35 km of a beetle finding.

These new restrictions come as a response to the potential threat posed by the D. micans bark beetle to the forestry industry in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. The beetle is known to cause significant damage to spruce trees, which are a valuable resource in the region.

Scottish Forestry has emphasized that these measures are necessary to protect the forests and timber industry in both Scotland and Ireland. The agency has been actively monitoring the presence of the D. micans bark beetle and has detected its presence in certain areas of the west of Scotland’s PFA.

The establishment of the 35 km buffer zone is a proactive step to prevent the further spread of the beetle and minimize the potential economic and ecological impact it may have. By restricting the movement of spruce logs with bark, the agency aims to prevent the transportation of the beetle to unaffected areas.

The cooperation between Scottish Forestry and government departments in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland highlights the shared commitment to combatting the threat of the D. micans bark beetle. By working together, these agencies can implement effective measures to protect the forestry industry and maintain the health of the region’s forests.

It is important for stakeholders in the forestry and timber industry to be aware of these new restrictions and comply with the regulations. By doing so, they can contribute to the preservation of Scotland and Ireland’s forests and ensure the long-term sustainability of the industry.

In conclusion, Scottish Forestry’s announcement of new restrictions on the movement of spruce logs with bark to the “island of Ireland” reflects the agency’s commitment to protecting the forestry industry from the potential threat of the D. micans bark beetle. These measures, implemented in collaboration with government departments in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, aim to reduce the risks associated with the beetle and safeguard the health of the region’s forests. It is crucial for stakeholders to adhere to these restrictions to ensure the long-term sustainability of the industry.

Matt Lyons

Matt Lyons

Matt Lyons is the founder of Forestry & Carbon. Matt has over 25 years as a forestry consultant and is invoilved in numerous carbon credit offset projects.

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